Horrors of War

In some letters, servicepersons would write their families descriptions of the horrors they witnessed in combat and the losses they experienced. Families often related to their loved ones news of other servicepersons dying in action or enduring injury.

Letter, Winnie Brooks to Clyde and Augusta Brooks, August 11, 1918

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Letter, Winnie Brooks to Clyde and Augusta Brooks, August 11, 1918.
Correspondence from Winnie Brooks to her brother and sister-in-law, Clyde and Augusta Brooks. Winnie served as a nurse at Camp Shelby during World War I. She writes, "I’ll be most awful glad when I leave been here a few months. I never worked until I came here. Of course I didn’t expect everything to be sunshine and roses."

Photograph, Earl Southworth Williford, undated<br />

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Photograph, Earl Southworth "Southy" Williford, undated.
Portrait of Earl Southworth "Southy" Williford, a World War I veteran. Williford was a native of Carroll County, Mississippi, and a 1917 graduate of The Agricultural and Mechanical College of the State of Mississippi.

Letter, Earl Southworth "Southy" Williford to his sister, January 1, 1919

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Letter, Earl Southworth "Southy" Williford to his sister, January 1, 1919.
Correspondence from Earl Williford to his sister. In this letter, he describes the incredible loss of life he witnessed serving in World War I. He states, "I will never forget the incident and now I am nervous as can be."

Photograph, Frank T. Jackson, 1946

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Photograph, Frank T. Jackson, 1946.
Photograph of S/SGT. Frank T. Jackson, who served from July 1943 to November 3, 1945. During this time, he served with the 44th FA Battalion, 4th Infantry Division. This photo was taken from the Service Men's Album: Oktibbeha County, Mississippi, World War II, which was published in 1946.

Letter, Frank T. Jackson to Parents, July 18, 1944<br />

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Letter, Frank T. Jackson to Mr. & Mrs. William P. Jackson, July 18, 1944.
Correspondence from Frank T. Jackson to his parents, Mr. & Mrs. William P. Jackson. In the letter, Frank expresses his deep shock after hearing of his brother, William, dying in action during World War II. He states: "[Billy] certainly had a lot of bad luck, but you can certainly be proud of him. After what I’ve seen here, I know a little bit about what he went through. Also being here makes the news easier for me, because you can get more used to that kind of thing here."

Letter, Fannye Rhodes to Luther Rhodes, October 14, 1945

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Letter, Fannye Rhodes to Luther Rhodes, October 14, 1945.
Correspondence from Fannye Rhodes to her husband, Luther, while he served in Southeast Asia during World War II. In the letter, she writes about the couple's friends, Bill and Jeanne. Fannye relates that "[Bill has] gotten his artificial leg and foot and thinks he'll get his discharge before long."

Horrors of War